Interview with Matti Vesanen

“The detailed sculpting of the face or hands is challenging but when you get it right, it takes the whole sculpture to a different level altogether”

Matti Vesanen is a 43 years old sculptor from the south of Finland. He imprisons human nature in fascinating resin, plaster, bronze or wood structures. The majority of his artworks explore the nude female figure from different perspectives, emotions and living moments. His sculptures are versatile, you can find them in private collections or public spaces, in gardens or in living rooms, in a 13-meter-high Corten steel relief or an 8cm tall bronze figure.

This Finnish artist is constantly working. He regularly shares on Instagram his works in progress and you can explore his techniques and his sculpting process on his website. Matti is always participating in expositions and exhibiting his works of art in local places and events. Also, every year —since 2013— he holds the annual Autumn Exhibition in a property of his own. Last August it was called “Immortals” and visitors could explore around 20 pieces of art inside the house and in the garden.

“Shipwrecked Madonna” by Matti Vesanen using PoseSpace photography as a reference (shared by artist)

His work has undoubtedly grown and expanded in the past few years. In this short Q&A interview, Matti explains how he got into art, the challenges he faces while sculpting and how his technique has evolved:

When did you first know you wanted to become an artist?

As a kid and teenager, I went to an art school for children and youth but never thought I would be an artist. I trained and worked as a mechanical engineer. When I was 26, I started sculpting as a hobby at the local community college, where they had a live model; I still go there to this day. Gradually the idea of becoming a professional artist sort of grew on me and I began to do sculpting, first part-time, then full time.

Do you listen to music while you work? What is your perfect environment to sculpt?

I do listen to the radio, mostly classical and rock music as well as talk radio. My studio is a fairly peaceful place without too many distractions. With two young kids, it’s a haven!

What challenges do you face working with the nude figure?

In my work I try to achieve a natural, unforced effect so that the pose wouldn’t seem rigid or artificial. You also have to consider all the possible directions from which you can look at the sculpture. A pose can look perfectly fine from one angle but strange from another. The detailed sculpting of the face or hands is challenging but when you get it right, it takes the whole sculpture to a different level altogether.

“And moss grew all over it” by Matti Vesanen using PoseSpace photography as a reference (shared by artist)

How did you discover www.posespace.com?

Around 2011 I was looking for model photos on the internet; I had previously used photos from another internet source for my work, but PoseSpace was better than the others. I could purchase single poses without subscribing to an annual membership. Most importantly for sculpting, the website provides the most camera angles of a model, much more than other similar websites. Seven years on, this is still the case.

How has your style changed over the years?

These days the surface of my sculptures is rougher, less polished than what it used to be. Now I often patinate the surface while my earlier work tended to have a more even and monochromatic finish. I find that patinating and visible layering of paint give more depth to the sculptures.

Website www.mattivesanen.com

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/vesanenmatti/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004514388768

Interview by Andrea Miliani

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